Philly tubist joins Yale music faculty

Carol Jantsch. Image courtesy of Sue Burrough.

Carol Jantsch, who became the Philadelphia Orchestra’s principal tubist in 2006 before completing her undergraduate studies at the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre, and Dance, will join the Yale School of Music faculty in the fall. According to a February news release, “(Jantsch) is on the faculty of the Curtis Institute of Music, Temple University Boyer College of Music, and Manhattan School of Music,” as well.

Jantsch earned her bachelor of music degree from the University of Michigan after “becoming the first female tuba player in a major symphony orchestra,” the news release indicates.

Tubist Paul Krzywicki, who is a faculty member at the Curtis Institute of Music, said, “I think anybody who has won a job recently has the closest touch with the audition process — not just the job itself but the competition that’s out there. Playing changes all the time, as does the audition process. It’s great when students have someone who won a job very recently — that’s the best information they can have. What sets Carol apart from many is that she’s very disciplined, very intelligent, and very focused. If students can approach the instrument with the kind of discipline and thoroughness she has, they’ll be better off. She has a good perspective of the instrument, both from solo and chamber music and an orchestral standpoint. She’s a well-rounded, thorough musician.”

According to her website (caroljantsch.com), Jantsch “has appeared as a soloist with the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, St. Petersburg Symphony Orchestra, Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra, and the United States Marine Band, among others.”

In 2009, Jantsch released Cascades, a collection of original works, transcriptions, and arrangements for tuba and piano.

A version of this story was published in February in the New Haven Independent.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,653 other followers

%d bloggers like this: